Table of Contents for ArchivesNext book, and see me at #saa17 if you want a bookmark

See, I told you that wouldn’t be the last post. I’m at SAA in Portland right now, handing out promotional bookmarks (featuring Biker Dog) like a mad woman.

Here’s the table of contents for the Selections from ArchivesNext book, which again should be available in a couple of weeks. It’s 70 posts, and I think does a fair job of representing the past decade. (If you’ve been reading me from the beginning that makes you feel old, doesn’t it?)

 

Getting Warmed Up

So, What’s Going on Here?

What is the “archives” brand?

What do archivists want?

What is our core identity, or, can we all fit under one big tent?

An Archivist’s 2.0 Manifesto?

Social Media and the Web         

“Getting the real work done”

NARA and the web harvest: a discussion of the issues

The role of blogs in professional discourse in the archival profession

Archivists and blogging, the conversation continues

An amazing Flickr success story: “maybe you found a photo of Phineas Gage? If so, it would be the only one known.”

Why are effective use of social media and participatory technologies critical? Winners of the book giveaway contest

The Archival Profession               

Vision (or lack of it) is the most critical issue facing the archival profession

A twisted mass of issues – the rest of my list

Two examples of how the future of archives is in connecting

Archival organizations provide advice to Obama Transition Team: Good news and bad news

My Version of Trendswatch 2012: The Archives Edition

Honest tips for wannabe archivists out there

The role of “the professional discipline” in archives and digital archives

Archives Writ Large

Archives are a luxury

Archives 2.0?

This is what I’m talking about: MPLP = Archives 2.0

Why we need to find a term to replace “citizen archivist”

A seeming consensus about a definition for “citizen archivist” and the continued need for a different term (also, a brief discussion of one of the next big challenges facing archives)

Horrors! The archives have been hacked! Wait–that’s a good thing.

The increasingly common use of “archive” as a verb

The problem with the scholar as “archivist,” or is there a problem?

Video available from Emory University: “Salman Rushdie Discusses Creativity and Digital Scholarship with Erika Farr ” (and also his archives)

Two meanings of “archival silences” and their implications

Debate: The majority of users don’t care about provenance. They just want access to information.

“Well done”: When context of records matters

A different kind of “archival silence”: “we are in the middle of a selective recreation of inherited culture”

Participatory Archives  

Clark Shirky on how to successfully (or unsuccessfully) attract online collaborators

Four “places” for archives to interact with users

Building participatory archives

The Future of Archives is Participatory: Archives as Platform, or A New Mission for Archives

Responding to Mike’s comments, and should I put this on a t-shirt?

Asking Smart People What They Think (or, Posts by Guest Bloggers)     

Richard Cox shares his thoughts on the future of archives

Kathleen Roe shares her thoughts on challenges/opportunities

Terry Baxter’s words of wisdom for the new year

Christine Di Bella’s candidates for greatest challenge and opportunity

Amy Cooper Cary: Challenge & opportunity are the same–diversify our future

Dan Santamaria shares some thoughts on the recent MPLP discussions

Our Friends, the Historians        

Reflections on “Archiving Social Media”

Archivists and historians—Am I giving archivists too much credit?

Some observations on the “archival divide,” or what I said at AHA about historians and archivists

Antoinette Burton’s perspective on the “archival divide:” remarks delivered at AHA

Peter Wosh’s thoughts on the “archival divide”: remarks delivered at AHA

Anything new here for archives? “Supporting the Changing Research Practices of Historians”

Yes, Archivists Have a Sense of Humor. Really.

You guys really don’t like Sharpies–the #badarchivists Twitter meme

The last of the #badarchivists

The archivist’s romance novel contest: What would you do if you were in her frumpy shoes?

Winners of the Archivist Romance Novel Contest: It’s the Romantics vs. the Cold-Hearted Career Women

Cerulean Pools vs. Archives-Made Shivs: The Honorable Mentions in the Archivist Romance Novel Contest

The OverlyHonestArchivists tweets

Things I Published or Said When Standing Behind a Podium      

What is the Meaning of Archives 2.0? (Article available)

“Archives in Context and as Context” in Journal of Digital Humanities

My talk from #AHA14: A Distinction worth Exploring: “Archives” and “Digital Historical Representations”

“Now is what matters”: My first official appearance as an “agent provocateur” at the Canadian Archives Summit

What is the Professional Archivist’s Role in the Evolving Archival Space? (A talk given in Christchurch, NZ)

Gaps in the Past and Gaps in the Future: Archival Silences and Social Media – #acaubc2016 talk

My #ACA2016 plenary: It’s the end of the archival profession as we know it, and I feel fine

Getting Personal, Doing Good  

WWTGD?

So, what’s going on here? (Independence Day edition)

Spontaneous Scholarships for SAA Annual Meeting: How to give, how to apply

Update on Spontaneous Scholarship Effort–Deadline to give extended & we’ll keep giving until we run out of money

2 weeks, 94 generous people, 26 happy people–Summing up the Spontaneous Scholarships

Crunching numbers on the Spontaneous Scholarships & where you can find me at #saa14

Dogs & Cats from the Archives to benefit the Cleveland Animal Protective League: The Rules

The Cleveland Animal Protective League–and Biker Dog–win! Thanks to your generosity.

Epilogue, or, Choose the Bigger Life

Epilogue, or, Choose the Bigger Life

As many of you know, I’ve been pulling together selections from this blog for a published collection. I started writing ArchivesNext in 2007, so a decade seems like a nice round number to celebrate. There will be about 70 posts collected in the book, which will be available shortly via Amazon in traditional and e-form. This post will not be the last one to be published here, as I’m sure I’ll be doing some book promotion in the coming weeks, but it’s the post that I’ll use as an epilogue to the book. Perhaps my outlook won’t be as bleak after attending the SAA meeting in Portland this week, but this captures my feelings as I finished up reviewing a decade’s worth of posts from ArchivesNext. I’ll still be around, here and in other forms, and this post sums up what’s next for me. 

 

Looking back over these posts, what strikes me most powerfully is how much the world—and I—have changed since I wrote them. I don’t have the ability to describe how disheartening it is to be living in the United States in 2017. I only hope that we don’t look back on this time and reflect on it as the beginning of the end of the world we knew. But I suspect we will. On most days, I feel overwhelmed by how little I think there is that I can do to make any kind of difference. I have lost the optimism and energy I had in 2007, when I thought—justifiably—that one person with a little blog could have an effect on the archival profession, and by extension, in some sense the world. The work I did did make a difference. I helped a lot of people. I wrote useful things. I made connections that inspired people think more creatively and contributed to building a community. It’s difficult to remember how fresh and necessary a lot of this was at the time.

But different times call for different actions. ArchivesNext was a blog about what was next for archives, focusing primarily on technology and social structures. What’s next for archives, and much of the world many of us value, is a slow extinction unless we do a better job of communicating outside our comfort zones. It’s been some years now since I made a resolution to shift my focus from writing about archives for archivists to writing about archives for non-archivists. With the completion of this book—a summary and celebration of the first phase of my writing career—I feel able to bring that part of my life to a close and move on.

In 2014 I proposed as a new mission statement for archives that they “add value to people’s lives by increasing their understanding and appreciation of the past.”  It’s a mission statement I also decided to adopt for myself, although at many times since then I’ve succumbed to the temptation to crawl back into my shell and focus on the problems of everyday life. But, the reality is that, at least for me, not engaging with the world doesn’t make me feel any better. As I write this, I am reminded of one of the resolutions recommended by a writer I admire, Gretchen Rubin, author of The Happiness Project (among other things). Gretchen uses as one of her life-guiding rules to always “choose the bigger life.”

And that’s what I’m going to try to do next. Writing the ArchivesNext blog was a wonderful experience for me, and at the time, it helped me to live a bigger life. But the world and I have changed. I need to move on, taking what I learned from that productive decade of my life, and try to tackle bigger problems and try to make my voice heard on a larger stage. I may not succeed, and I certainly won’t realize the vision I have for myself, but I hope I can achieve in my next decade of writing as much as I did in my first.

My thanks again, with all my heart, to those who helped me on the journey this book represents. One of the most rewarding parts of building ArchivesNext was the connections and friendships I made with people around the world. You continue to inspire me every day, and I hope I can return the favor in the future by inspiring others to appreciate the richness and complexity of archives.

 

The New Archival Canon: Round Two

Last year I asked for your thoughts about what you considered essential readings about archives–either by archivists or not. I’ve organized your suggestions a bit, and they are posted below, but I suspect we still have some gaps in the list of New Essentials. So it’s time for Round Two–what do you think needs to be included in the New Archival Canon, or to put it more modestly, what does ever archivist need to read? What has had the most influence on you? Thanks, as always, for your input.

The List

Jefferson Bailey, Disrespect des Fonds: Rethinking Arrangement and Description in Born-Digital Archives, Archive Journal Summer 2013 http://www.archivejournal.net/issue/3/archives-remixed/disrespect-des-fonds-rethinking-arrangement-and-description-in-born-digital-archives/

Laurie Baty’s “Photographs are not Wallpaper.” NEED CITATION

Francis X. Blouin, Jr. and William G. Rosenberg, Editors, Archives, Documentation, and Institutions of Social Memory: Essays from the Sawyer Seminar,” 2006 https://muse.jhu.edu/book/351

Frank Boles, “Just a Bunch of Bigots” A Case Study in the Acquisition of Controversial Material. http://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/45694

Antoinette Burton editor, Archive Stories: Facts, Fictions, and the Writing of History, 2006 https://www.dukeupress.edu/archive-stories

Michelle Caswell and Marika Cifor, From Human Rights to Feminist Ethics: Radical Empathy in the Archives, Archivaria, Spring 2016 http://archivaria.ca/index.php/archivaria/article/view/13557

Scott Cline, “’Dust Clouds of Camels Shall Cover You’: Covenant and the Archival Endeavor.” American Archivist Fall/Winter 2012 http://americanarchivist.org/doi/pdf/10.17723/aarc.75.2.03193j1517858r34

Terry Cook, “What is past is prologue: a history of archival ideas since 1898, and the future paradigm shift.” Archivaria 43 (1997): 17-63 http://archivaria.ca/index.php/archivaria/article/view/12175/13184

Terry Cook and Joan M. Schwartz, “Archives, Records, and Power: From (Postmodern) Theory to (Archival) Performance.” Archival Science 2, no. 3-4 (2002):171–185. https://www.nyu.edu/classes/bkg/methods/cook.pdf

Terry Cook, “The Concept of the Archival Fonds in the Post-Custodial Era: Theory, Problems and Solutions,” Archivaria, Spring 1993 http://arqtleufes.pbworks.com/w/file/fetch/94919891/COOK%20TERRY_The%20Concept%20of%20the%20Archival%20Fonds.pdf

Terry Cook, “Evidence, memory, identity, and community: four shifting archival paradigms,” Archival Science June 2013 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10502-012-9180-7

Terry Cook, “Fashionable Nonsense or Professional Rebirth: Postmodernism and the Practice of Archives,” Archivaria Spring 2001 http://archivaria.ca/index.php/archivaria/article/view/12792

Bruce Dearstyne, Leading and managing archives and records programs: strategies for success, 2008 https://www.amazon.com/Leading-Managing-Archives-Records-Programs/dp/1555706150

Jacques Derrida, Archive Fever, 1998 https://www.amazon.com/Archive-Fever-Freudian-Impression-Postmodernism/dp/0226143678

Jacques Derrida, GENESES, GENEALOGIES, GENRES, AND GENIUS: THE SECRETS OF THE ARCHIVE https://amzn.com/B0071I536K

Jarrett M. Drake, Insurgent citizens: the manufacture of police records in post-Katrina New Orleans and its implications for human rights, Archival Science October 2014 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10502-014-9224-2

Michel Duchein, “Theoretical Principles and Practical Problems of Respect des fonds in Archival Science,” Archivaria Summer 1983 http://archivaria.ca/index.php/archivaria/article/viewFile/12648/13813

Luciana Duranti, Archives as a Place, Archives & Social Studies: A Journal of Interdisciplinary Research Vol. 1, no. 0 (March 2007) http://archivo.cartagena.es/files/36-165-DOC_FICHERO1/07-duranti_archives.pdf

Luciana Duranti, Diplomatics: New Uses for an Old Science, Archivaria, Summer 1989: http://archivaria.ca/index.php/archivaria/article/viewFile/11567/12513

Ursula Franklin’s The Real World of Technology (1992) https://amzn.com/088784636X

Elsie Freeman, “Buying Quarter Inch Holes: Public Support Through Results” Midwestern Archivist, 1985:  https://minds.wisconsin.edu/handle/1793/45944

Elisabeth Friedman, THE ANTI-ARCHIVE? CLAUDE LANZMANN’S SHOAH AND THE DILEMMAS OF HOLOCAUST REPRESENTATION, http://www.academia.edu/2060148/THE_ANTI-ARCHIVE_CLAUDE_LANZMANNS_SHOAH_AND_THE_DILEMMAS_OF_HOLOCAUST_REPRESENTATION

Timothy J. Gilfoyle, “Prostitutes in the Archives: Problems and Possibilities in Documenting the History of Sexuality,” American Archivist Summer 1994 http://americanarchivist.org/doi/pdf/10.17723/aarc.57.3.p74tr646p6r530lv

Anne Gilliland and Sue McKemmish, “Building an Infrastructure for Archival Research,” Archival Science December 2004 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10502-006-6742-6

Tim Gollins, Parsimonious preservation: preventing pointless processes! (The small simple steps that take digital preservation a long way forward), 2009 http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documents/information-management/parsimonious-preservation.pdf …

Mark A. Greene and Dennis Meissner, “More Product, Less Process: Revamping Traditional Archival Processing,” American Archivist Fall/Winter 2005 http://www.archivists.org/prof-education/pre-readings/IMPLP/AA68.2.MeissnerGreene.pdf

Gerald Ham, The Archival Edge, American Archivist, Jan. 1975: http://americanarchivist.org/doi/pdf/10.17723/aarc.38.1.7400r86481128424

Verne Harris, Archives and Justice: A South African Perspective,2013 http://saa.archivists.org/store/archives-and-justice-a-south-african-perspective-pdf/3691/

Peter Hirtle, Authenticity in a Digital Environment, CLIR, 2000:  https://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/pub92/pub92.pdf

Randall C. Jimerson, Archives Power: Memory, Accountability, and Social Justice, 2009 http://saa.archivists.org/store/archives-power-memory-accountability-and-social-justice/1354/

Randall C. Jimerson, “Archives for All: Professional Responsibility and Social Justice,” American Archivist Fall/Winter 2007 http://americanarchivist.org/doi/pdf/10.17723/aarc.70.2.5n20760751v643m7

Elisabeth Kaplan, “We Are What We Collect, We Collect What We Are: Archives and the Construction of Identity,” American Archivist Spring/Summer 2000 http://conservancy.umn.edu/bitstream/handle/11299/42433/1/kaplan_we_are_what.pdf

Eric Ketelaar, “Archival Temples, Archival Prisons: Modes of Power and Protection,” Archival Science 2, 2002 http://home.hccnet.nl/e.ketelaar/ArchivalTemples.pdf

Eric Ketelaar, Tacit Narratives: The Meanings of Archives, Archival Science 2001 https://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/handle/2027.42/41812

Matthew Kirschenbaum, Mechanisms: New Media and the Forensic Imagination (2008) https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/mechanisms

Michelle Light and Tom Hyry (2002) Colophons and Annotations: New Directions for the Finding Aid. The American Archivist: Fall/Winter, Vol. 65, No. 2, pp. 216-230. https://doi.org/10.17723/aarc.65.2.l3h27j5x8716586q

John MacDonald, Managing Records in a Modern Office: Taming the Wild Frontier, Archivaria 29 Spring 1995: http://archivaria.ca/index.php/archivaria/article/view/12069/13047

Sue McKemmish, “Evidence of Me,” The Australian Library Journal 1996 http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00049670.1996.10755757

Ernst Posner’s American State ArchivesArchives & the Public Interest: selected essays,  and Archives in the ancient world. (“None of them end up being the book you thought you were going to read.”)

Protocols for Native American Archival Materials http://www2.nau.edu/libnap-p/

Lee Raine and Barry Wellman, Networked: The New Social Operating System 2014 https://amzn.com/0262526166

Peter Scott (1966) The Record Group Concept: A Case for Abandonment. The American Archivist: October 1966, Vol. 29, No. 4, pp. 493-504:  http://americanarchivist.org/doi/10.17723/aarc.29.4.y886054240174401

Joan M. Schwartz, “Records of Simple Truth and Precision”: Photography, Archives, and the Illusion of Control, Archivaria Fall 2000 http://www.archivaria.ca/index.php/archivaria/article/view/12763/13951

Lucy Suchman, Making Work Visible, Communications of the ACM, Sept 1995: http://guzdial.cc.gatech.edu/hci-seminar/uploads/1/Suchman’s+Making+Work+Visible.pdf

Ciaran B. Trace, “What is Recorded is Never Simply ‘What Happened’: Record Keeping in Modern Organizational Culture,” Archival Science 2002 https://www.ischool.utexas.edu/~cbtrace/pubs/CBT_ArchScience_2002.pdf

Reto Tschan, A Comparison of Jenkinson and Schellenberg on Appraisal, American Archivist Fall/Winter 2002: http://americanarchivist.org/doi/pdf/10.17723/aarc.65.2.920w65g3217706l

S. Williams Implications of Archival Labor, https://medium.com/on-archivy/implications-of-archival-labor-b606d8d02014#.wyb8jlp3y

Mark D. Wolfe, “Beyond ‘‘green buildings:’’ exploring the effects of Jevons’ Paradox on the sustainability of archival practices, 2011.

Elizabeth Yakel, “Archival Representation,” Archival Science 2003 https://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/handle/2027.42/41831/10502_2004_Article_5139967.pdf?sequence=1

Elisabeth Yakel,  “Thinking Inside and Outside the Boxes”http://archivaria.ca/index.php/archivaria/article/viewFile/12742/13927 …

 

What do you consider essential reading about archives?

What readings do you consider the most influential on your thoughts/practice as an archivist? Which readings are essential for the field?

If you’re not an archivist, what readings have informed your knowledge of archives?

Update–responses so far from Twitter and Facebook

Peter Hirtle, Authenticity in a Digital Environment, CLIR, 2000:  https://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/pub92/pub92.pdf

Gerald Ham, The Archival Edge, American Archivist, Jan. 1975:

http://americanarchivist.org/doi/pdf/10.17723/aarc.38.1.7400r86481128424

John MacDonald, Managing Records in a Modern Office: Taming the Wild Frontier, Archivaria 29 Spring 1995: http://archivaria.ca/index.php/archivaria/article/view/12069/13047

Lucy Suchman, Making Work Visible, Communications of the ACM, Sept 1995: http://guzdial.cc.gatech.edu/hci-seminar/uploads/1/Suchman’s+Making+Work+Visible.pdf

Jacques Derrida, Archive Fever, 1998 https://www.amazon.com/Archive-Fever-Freudian-Impression-Postmodernism/dp/0226143678

Jacques Derrida, GENESES, GENEALOGIES, GENRES, AND GENIUS: THE SECRETS OF THE ARCHIVE https://amzn.com/B0071I536K

Elsie Freeman, “Buying Quarter Inch Holes: Public Support Through Results” Midwestern Archivist, 1985:  https://minds.wisconsin.edu/handle/1793/45944

Terry Cook, “What is past is prologue: a history of archival ideas since 1898, and the future paradigm shift.” Archivaria 43 (1997): 17-63 http://archivaria.ca/index.php/archivaria/article/view/12175/13184

Terry Cook and Joan M. Schwartz, “Archives, Records, and Power: From (Postmodern) Theory to (Archival) Performance.” Archival Science 2, no. 3-4 (2002):171–185. https://www.nyu.edu/classes/bkg/methods/cook.pdf

Bruce Dearstyne, Leading and managing archives and records programs: strategies for success, 2008 https://www.amazon.com/Leading-Managing-Archives-Records-Programs/dp/1555706150

Peter Scott (1966) The Record Group Concept: A Case for Abandonment. The American Archivist: October 1966, Vol. 29, No. 4, pp. 493-504:  http://americanarchivist.org/doi/10.17723/aarc.29.4.y886054240174401

Elisabeth Yakel, but especially “Thinking Inside and Outside the Boxes”

Luciana Duranti, Archives as a Place, Archives & Social Studies: A Journal of Interdisciplinary Research Vol. 1, no. 0 (March 2007) http://archivo.cartagena.es/files/36-165-DOC_FICHERO1/07-duranti_archives.pdf

Joan M. Schwartz, “Records of Simple Truth and Precision”: Photography, Archives, and the Illusion of Control, Archivaria Fall 2000 http://www.archivaria.ca/index.php/archivaria/article/view/12763/13951

Reto Tschan, A Comparison of Jenkinson and Schellenberg on Appraisal, American Archivist Fall/Winter 2002: http://americanarchivist.org/doi/pdf/10.17723/aarc.65.2.920w65g3217706l1

Luciana Duranti, Diplomatics: New Uses for an Old Science, Archivaria, Summer 1989: http://archivaria.ca/index.php/archivaria/article/viewFile/11567/12513

Tim Gollins, Parsimonious preservation: preventing pointless processes! (The small simple steps that take digital preservation a long way forward), 2009  

S. Williams Implications of Archival Labor, https://medium.com/on-archivy/implications-of-archival-labor-b606d8d02014#.wyb8jlp3y

Jarrett M. Drake, Insurgent citizens: the manufacture of police records in post-Katrina New Orleans and its implications for human rights, Archival Science October 2014 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10502-014-9224-2

Michelle Caswell and Marika Cifor, From Human Rights to Feminist Ethics: Radical Empathy in the Archives, Archivaria, Spring 2016 http://archivaria.ca/index.php/archivaria/article/view/13557

Randall C. Jimerson, Archives Power: Memory, Accountability, and Social Justice, 2009 http://saa.archivists.org/store/archives-power-memory-accountability-and-social-justice/1354/

Mark D. Wolfe, “Beyond ‘‘green buildings:’’ exploring the effects of Jevons’ Paradox on the sustainability of archival practices, 2011.

Terry Cook, Heather MacNeil and Luciana around authenticity and reliability.Verne Harris, Terry Cook & Joan Schwartz, Rand Jimerson

Everything ever written about appraisal (“It was easier than saying Taylor/Greene/Cook/Samuels/Eastwood/Boles/Ericson ;”)

More updates from Facebook and Twitter: 

Ernst Posner’s American State Archives, Archives & the Public Interest: selected essays,  and Archives in the ancient world. (“None of them end up being the book you thought you were going to read.”)

Mark A. Greene and Dennis Meissner, “More Product, Less Process: Revamping Traditional Archival Processing,” American Archivist Fall/Winter 2005 http://www.archivists.org/prof-education/pre-readings/IMPLP/AA68.2.MeissnerGreene.pdf

Laurie Baty’s “Photographs are not Wallpaper.”

Scott Cline, “’Dust Clouds of Camels Shall Cover You’: Covenant and the Archival Endeavor.” American Archivist Fall/Winter 2012 http://americanarchivist.org/doi/pdf/10.17723/aarc.75.2.03193j1517858r34

Randall C. Jimerson, “Archives for All: Professional Responsibility and Social Justice,” American Archivist Fall/Winter 2007 http://americanarchivist.org/doi/pdf/10.17723/aarc.70.2.5n20760751v643m7

Eric Ketelaar, “Archival Temples, Archival Prisons: Modes of Power and Protection,” Archival Science 2, 2002 http://home.hccnet.nl/e.ketelaar/ArchivalTemples.pdf

Michel Duchein, “Theoretical Principles and Practical Problems of Respect des fonds in Archival Science,” Archivaria Summer 1983 

http://archivaria.ca/index.php/archivaria/article/viewFile/12648/13813

Terry Cook, “The Concept of the Archival Fonds in the Post-Custodial Era: Theory, Problems and Solutions,” Archivaria, Spring 1993 http://arqtleufes.pbworks.com/w/file/fetch/94919891/COOK%20TERRY_The%20Concept%20of%20the%20Archival%20Fonds.pdf

Timothy J. Gilfoyle, “Prostitutes in the Archives: Problems and Possibilities in Documenting the History of Sexuality,” American Archivist Summer 1994 http://americanarchivist.org/doi/pdf/10.17723/aarc.57.3.p74tr646p6r530lv

Terry Cook, “Evidence, memory, identity, and community: four shifting archival paradigms,” Archival Science June 2013 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10502-012-9180-7

Francis X. Blouin, Jr. and William G. Rosenberg, Editors, Archives, Documentation, and Institutions of Social Memory: Essays from the Sawyer Seminar,” 2006 https://muse.jhu.edu/book/351

Elisabeth Kaplan, “We Are What We Collect, We Collect What We Are: Archives and the Construction of Identity,” American Archivist Spring/Summer 2000 http://conservancy.umn.edu/bitstream/handle/11299/42433/1/kaplan_we_are_what.pdf

Terry Cook, “Fashionable Nonsense or Professional Rebirth: Postmodernism and the Practice of Archives,” Archivaria Spring 2001 http://archivaria.ca/index.php/archivaria/article/view/12792

Anne Gilliland and Sue McKemmish, “Building an Infrastructure for Archival Research,” Archival Science December 2004 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10502-006-6742-6

Sue McKemmish, “Evidence of Me,” The Australian Library Journal 1996 http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00049670.1996.10755757

Elizabeth Yakel, “Archival Representation,” Archival Science 2003 https://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/handle/2027.42/41831/10502_2004_Article_5139967.pdf?sequence=1

Ciaran B. Trace, “What is Recorded is Never Simply ‘What Happened’: Record Keeping in Modern Organizational Culture,” Archival Science 2002 https://www.ischool.utexas.edu/~cbtrace/pubs/CBT_ArchScience_2002.pdf

Eric Ketelaar, Tacit Narratives: The Meanings of Archives, Archival Science 2001 https://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/handle/2027.42/41812

Verne Harris, Archives and Justice: A South African Perspective, 2013 http://saa.archivists.org/store/archives-and-justice-a-south-african-perspective-pdf/3691/

Antoinette Burton editor, Archive Stories: Facts, Fictions, and the Writing of History, 2006 https://www.dukeupress.edu/archive-stories

Ursula Franklin’s The Real World of Technology (1992) https://amzn.com/088784636X

Lee Raine and Barry Wellman, Networked: The New Social Operating System 2014 https://amzn.com/0262526166

Elisabeth Friedman, THE ANTI-ARCHIVE? CLAUDE LANZMANN’S SHOAH AND THE DILEMMAS OF HOLOCAUST REPRESENTATION, http://www.academia.edu/2060148/THE_ANTI-ARCHIVE_CLAUDE_LANZMANNS_SHOAH_AND_THE_DILEMMAS_OF_HOLOCAUST_REPRESENTATION

Jefferson Bailey, Disrespect des Fonds: Rethinking Arrangement and Description in Born-Digital Archives, Archive Journal Summer 2013 http://www.archivejournal.net/issue/3/archives-remixed/disrespect-des-fonds-rethinking-arrangement-and-description-in-born-digital-archives/

 

 

“So, what are you working on now?” “Well, I’m taking sixteen spreadsheets . . .”

Ok, so I feel defensive and somewhat embarrassed by what I’m working on these days. Which, as you’ll see, I really shouldn’t because it’s a very worthwhile endeavor, but not one that’s exactly in line with my prior exploits. I’m not just writing this to beg for affirmations, but on the other hand, I am looking for support to help me overcome my feelings that it’s not “enough.” Let me explain.

Continue reading ““So, what are you working on now?” “Well, I’m taking sixteen spreadsheets . . .””

Question about tattoos from a Prospective Archivist

Sorry for the delay, Prospective Archivist, who posted this question in response to the post “Honest tips for wannabe archivists out there,” (which is one of the more popular ones from the site’s recent “archive”):

 

So, I know this is a very silly question and it focuses on maybe one of if not the least important statements that you listed, but when you say ‘absent that, drink beer and get a tattoo’ what exactly do you mean / imply?

I ask because I do have a few tattoos, one that is visible if I do not wear sleeves, and I have worried to myself that this career maybe is one that does not generally encourage visible tattoos. Would you say that it is generally okay or even common to have visible tattoos in the career field? I know every institution is different, but like I said just in general.

It is something that has been in the back of the mind for a while. If there is no clear answer, that is okay. I have been looking for someone to ask this for a while and your statement reminded me. Thank you for your response in advance!

I’ll give you my personal response, and then I’ll throw the question about the community, and I particularly encourage comments from our colleagues who do regular interviewing and hiring.

In general, I’d say that today it’s ok. As you point out, every place is different, and maybe more traditionally conservative repositories would be less accepting of them, but honestly, I’d have to say that it might not be wise to generalize even about those. I’m really in no position to judge since I don’t have them, but I get the sense that the culture at large has become more accepting at a faster past then one might have expected. I mean, as long as you don’t have a swastika or something in which the content itself might be objectionable, I think you’re ok.

But, what do you say, archival community? I know there have been sessions at SAA annual meetings about tattoos, and there may even be someone out there with a Hollinger box on their body, but when you’re looking across the table at a someone as a prospective hire or promotion, or just as a colleague, does it make a difference?

 

The final round: Animals from the Archives

And so, the final two top contenders have valiantly triumphed over turtles, camels, snakes, cats, bears, gorillas, hippos, elephants, goats, cows, and (unbelievably) even otters. You, the voters, have selected one adorable dog and three adorable pigs to compete for the prize of Top Animal from the Archives 2016. How can anyone choose between them? Well, you’ll have to. Or, you can just make a donation to Furkids (and report it to Caryn) and declare them both winners.

Polls will close for this final round at 5 pm EST on Friday, August 5, and remember that for each vote you’re honor-bound to donate (at least) $1 to Furkids. (And let Caryn know how much you’ve donated so we can know how much this little stunt has raised.) If you’re not familiar with what this contest is about and how it works, please review the Rules post.

Thanks to everyone who has donated so far, and remember, “Vote, vote, vote, like a baby stoat!” Help spread the word among your friends and colleagues, both at #saa16 and those still keeping things going smoothly at home.

Here are your finalists:


Animals from the Archives: The Final Four

And now there are four.

They are all adorable, but only two can make it on to battle it out for the top prize. Polls will close for this round at 5 pm EST on Monday, August 1, and remember that for each vote you’re honor-bound to donate (at least) $1 to Furkids. (And let Caryn know how much you’ve donated so we can know how much this little stunt has raised.) If you’re not familiar with what this contest is about and how it works, please review the Rules post.

 



Animals from the Archives: Round Three

We’re down to the Elite Eight now, and there are no easy choices. But it’s more important than ever to vote to keep your favorites in the running for the top honor. These polls will close at 5 pm EST on Thursday, July 28, and remember that for each vote you’re honor-bound to donate (at least) $1 to Furkids. (And let Caryn know how much you’ve donated so we can know how much this little stunt has raised.) If you’re not familiar with what this contest is about and how it works, please review the Rules post.





Animals from the Archives: Round Two

Well, sadly, not everyone can make it through to the end. But we’re here to celebrate the 16 animals who have moved to this next round, and are now competing for your love, votes, and donation dollars. As always, if you’re voting, you need to be donating to Furkids. (If you’re not familiar with what this contest is about and how it works, please review the Rules post.)

Voting for this round will remain open until 5 pm EST on Sunday, July 24. Below you will see 8 brackets with 16 animals competing. (To see a larger version of any image, click on it.) Round Two, in which only 8 animals will vie for your love, is scheduled to kick off on Monday, July 25. Vote now and help your favorites advance to the next round!