Animals from the Archives: Round Two

Well, sadly, not everyone can make it through to the end. But we’re here to celebrate the 16 animals who have moved to this next round, and are now competing for your love, votes, and donation dollars. As always, if you’re voting, you need to be donating to Furkids. (If you’re not familiar with what this contest is about and how it works, please review the Rules post.)

Voting for this round will remain open until 5 pm EST on Sunday, July 24. Below you will see 8 brackets with 16 animals competing. (To see a larger version of any image, click on it.) Round Two, in which only 8 animals will vie for your love, is scheduled to kick off on Monday, July 25. Vote now and help your favorites advance to the next round!

 









Time to submit your best Animals From the Archives photos to help Atlanta-based animal rescue group!

It’s back!

You loved it last year and contributed over $3,400 to the Cleveland Animal Protective League to help push Biker Dog to victory in the first ever Dogs and Cats from the Archives competition.  But this year, we’re going bigger. That’s right. This year photos of ANY AND ALL ANIMALS from your archival collections will compete to win the top spot, and become the King or Queen of the Archival Animal Kingdom.

As you may remember from last year’s competition between cats and dogs, our colleague Caryn Radick was inspired to explore ways our archival community could help a local animal shelter in conjunction with the SAA annual meeting in Cleveland last August. In addition to onsite opportunities to help, Caryn and I teamed up to host a virtual battle royale between your cats and dogs from the archives, and it was a howling success, so we’re taking it on to Atlanta this year.

So now it’s time for you to begin searching your collections for your favorite animal (or animals—groups are fine).  It will work basically the same as it did last year, but here are the details:

On or about July 11 we’ll launch a March Madness-style competition, in which your donations to the Atlanta animal rescue organization Furkids will allow you to vote for your favorite images of animals from the archives. We’ll start out with a “sweet 16” and by the week before the SAA meeting it will be down to one top animal from each bracket battling it out for supremacy, with the winner announced on August 5. We’ll follow up with more information about how you can vote, but for now we need you to send in the best images of animals your collections have to offer.  Please send an image or a link (with no copyright restrictions, please) to kate.theimer [@] gmail.com no later than Wednesday, July 6. We’ll do the hard work of selecting the final animals for the competition, and then announce how you can support your favorites, and more importantly, support the great work of Furkids!

Details:

1) Yes, you can send in more than one image. But no more than five per institution, please!

2) Submissions from outside the U.S. are welcomed.

3) Please provide an appropriate credit line for your image.

4) Any and all combinations of animals are welcomed, but we’re going to limit it to photographs of living animals. So no illustrations from books or paintings this time around.

Any questions, just ask and enjoy scouring your collections for your finest furred, feathered, and scaled friends!

 

Ok, so here’s the deal with me lately

If you’ve been following me on Twitter or reading this blog regularly, you probably noticed that I’ve been pretty quiet for a long time. I wanted to talk a bit about that, both because I thought it would be a good idea to explain what’s been going on and also share some of my perspective about it. If sharing my experience is useful to even a few people, then it’s worth doing. People who know me from Facebook have already heard a lot about this, and I’ve tweeted about it now and then, so this isn’t entirely news, but still, I feel like giving it a fuller treatment here.

So, here’s the deal.

Continue reading “Ok, so here’s the deal with me lately”

Testing, testing

This is a test. I’m trying out the polling options that I hope we’ll be using for the Cats & Dogs From the Archives contest that will launch this weekend. If you see this, please take a look at the two polls below and vote in them. Try voting more than once (maybe twice, but don’t go crazy). Let me know what you think of how it works. I don’t have unlimited options, but some things are configurable. I think we should let people see the results, don’t you?

Note if you want to see a bigger version of the image, just click on it.

There are two test polls below. Please keep scrolling down to vote in both of them.



New test:

What’s next? A slight hitch in the proceedings

I’m somewhat torn about writing this update, but since I advocate transparency for others, I feel as if I should follow my own advice. A while back I announced that I’d be kicking off a new project (well, actually two), but I haven’t made much progress with them. So, what’s up with that? Continue reading “What’s next? A slight hitch in the proceedings”

What’s next?

I’ve been contemplating a change for quite a while now, and hinting at it for some time, but I think it’s time to put out there what I’ve got in mind for my next project. I enjoyed all the work I’ve done here on this blog, which branched out on to Twitter and speaking engagements around the world, as well as editing a whole lot of books and serving on SAA’s Council. I’ve been very successful at observing and commenting on the world of archives and I enjoyed doing it. And I don’t want to leave that role behind entirely, but I need to tackle something new.

I want to, as they say, “be the change,” so very soon I’ll be launching a new project devoted to sharing what I know about the world of archives with the general public. I don’t know how successful I’ll be at reaching beyond an audience of records professionals, but believe me, I’ll try. On Tumblr or Twitter or whatever platform(s) I end up using I’ll share stories that I think will show the public what archives are about today as well as some history of how the profession developed in the U.S. and the challenges we face.  As I write original content I’ll be learning some new things and re-learning others to try to demystify a field which can apparently be intimidating or opaque to many people. (And I’ll also be moving forward with the Helping History site I wrote about last month.)

I hope I can use the new blog as a starting point for a mass-market trade paperback, suitable for the front table of your local Barnes & Noble (and for easy download to your e-reader of choice) and the top of the New York Times bestseller list, but if not that, at least I hope I can do some good by opening up the world of archives to as many people as possible and blowing the dust off some outdated stereotypes.

In the course of working on the new project, I’m sure I’ll run across information more suitable to share here on ArchivesNext, and I also suspect I will continue to use this blog (and Twitter account) to ask questions and get feedback from my fellow professionals.  So ArchivesNext will continue on, but change is good for all of us. And I’m excited about moving from talking amongst ourselves to trying to reach out to promote archives to the world.

More about Management: Innovative Practices for Archives and Special Collections

You can order Management: Innovative Practices for Archives and Special Collections from the Rowman & Littlefield site (and save 20% by using the promotional code 7S14ARCH). The Table of Contents is available there, and you can also read the pre-publication reviews from Michael Kurtz and David Carmichael. 

To help give you a better idea of what’s in the book, here’s an excerpt from the Introduction:

Continue reading “More about Management: Innovative Practices for Archives and Special Collections”

More about Description: Innovative Practices for Archives and Special Collections

You can order Description: Innovative Practices for Archives and Special Collections from the Rowman & Littlefield site (and save 20% by using the promotional code 7S14ARCH). The Table of Contents is available there, and you can also read the pre-publication reviews from Kathleen Roe and Bill Landis.

To help give you a better idea of what’s in the book, here’s an excerpt from the Introduction:  Continue reading “More about Description: Innovative Practices for Archives and Special Collections”

More about Outreach: Innovative Practices for Archives and Special Collections

You can order Outreach: Innovative Practices for Archives and Special Collections from the Rowman & Littlefield site (and save 20% by using the promotional code 7S14ARCH). The Table of Contents is available there, and you can also read the pre-publication reviews from Larry Hackman and Terry Baxter. 

To help give you a better idea of what’s in the book, here’s an excerpt from the Introduction: 

Continue reading “More about Outreach: Innovative Practices for Archives and Special Collections”

Help a librarian/archivist raise money to help elephants

Posted on behalf of Jessica Fisher. As my Twitter and Facebook friends know, I am always happy to help anyone who is trying to help animals. Go, Jessica!

I am a Librarian/Archivist in NYC and I recently signed on to make tracks for elephants at the WCS Run for the Wild at the Bronx Zoo. I would be very grateful if you could support my fundraising efforts with a tax-deductible donation. Your support will go a long way in helping me to protect imperiled elephants and the places they call home. To make a donation online, simply click on the link at the bottom of this message. If you would prefer, you can also send your contribution to the following address:

WCS Run for the Wild
2300 Southern Boulevard
Bronx, NY 10460