Two new SAA awards–Emerging Leader and Archival Innovator–I know you know some people/projects who qualify

This year SAA has two brand new awards that I’m very excited about because I think they provide an effective upgrade and replacement for the two awards I’ve sponsored on this blog, the Best Archives on the Web and Movers & Shakers in Archives awards. I always hoped that eventually SAA would offer awards in these areas, and now that they have the Emerging Leader and Archival Innovator awards, I think ArchivesNext can retire from the field of awards.

So, first things first, the deadline for nominations for both is February 28, so you have to get moving on this.

The Emerging Leader award (brought forward and championed by SAA President Gregor Trinkaus-Randall) has the following purpose and criteria:

Created in 2011, this award celebrates and encourages early-career archivists who have completed archival work of broad merit, demonstrated significant promise of leadership, and/or performed commendable service to the archives profession.  Nominees will have more than two years and less than ten years of professional archives experience. Nominees must be SAA members and must meet as many of the following criteria as possible:

  • Work of merit that has made a substantive contribution to an area (or areas) of the archives profession beyond the nominee’s local institution and that holds promise for future contributions.
  • Demonstrated leadership through collaborative work or exemplary service to local, regional, and/or national archival and cultural associations.
  • Formal archival education through a graduate degree program in history, library science, information science, or a related field; through participation in an archival or preservation institute; and/or through certification by the Academy of Certified Archivists.
  • Involvement in successful outreach and advocacy efforts on behalf of the nominee’s institution and the archives profession.

Full information on the Emerging Leader Award is available here.

The Archival Innovator award (proposed, with love, by me) has the following purpose and criteria:

Created in 2011, this award recognizes an individual archivist, a group of archivists, a repository, or an organization that demonstrates, through a combination of as many as possible of the criteria below, the greatest overall current impact on the profession or their communities.

  • Creativity or innovation in approaching professional challenges.
  • Demonstrated ability to think outside of professional or institutional norms.
  • Ability to translate creativity, innovation, and new thinking into working solutions.
  • Development of an archives program or outreach activity that has an extraordinary impact on a community.
  • Commitment to the advancement of professional knowledge through traditional or emerging information-sharing media.

Complete information about the Archival Innovator Award is available here.

I know time is short and I apologize for not posting this earlier, but you still have enough time to put nominations together. The people who deserve these awards are doing great work and should be recognized and celebrated. Please make the work of the awards committee difficult and send in some great nominations.

Winners: 2010 Movers & Shakers in Archives awards

I am delighted to announce the winners of the third annual Movers and Shakers in Archives awards. Sponsored by the ArchivesNext blog, these awards are intended to recognize people or organizations in the United States who are innovative, creative, and making a difference in the archival world. The envelope, please!

David Carmicheal, Director, The Georgia Archives

The nomination for David highlighted his contributions in the areas of disaster preparedness, electronic records, archival advocacy, and archival education as well as his commitment to providing superior service to patrons of his state’s archives. However, it was his leadership of the Council of State Archivists in the wake of Hurricane Katrina that went above and beyond what is normally expected of that role. As his nominator described: “he took on managing the CoSA sponsored post-hurricane conference to assess needs nationally, helped write a grant proposal to FEMA that brought $2.6 million to CoSA to develop training on records preparedness, and offered to house the staff for the Intergovernmental Preparedness for Essential Records project. In his ‘spare time’ on weekends, he has written two very practical publications relating to disaster preparedness which are available from the Council of State Archivists: Rescuing Family Records: A Disaster Planning Guide and Rescuing Business Records: A Disaster Planning Guide for Small Businesses. He has donated the bulk of the proceeds from the sales of these manuals to CoSA.” David provides all archivists with a role model for effective leadership and service through his extraordinary commitment to his employer, his profession, and his community.

Gordon Daines, Archivist and Assistant Department Chair, Manuscripts in the L. Tom Perry Special Collections at Brigham Young University

Like David Carmichael, Gordon has volunteered his time to professional organizations, but it was his personal initiative and perseverance that singled him out in the mind of his nominator.

He has found varied and innovative ways to bring educational opportunities to archivists. He was instrumental in the development of both Western Roundups (2005 in Las Vegas and 2010 in Seattle)–super-regional conferences for the four western regional archival organizations. He has also recently published (with colleague Cory Nimer) The Interactive Archivist online via SAA’s publishing arm. It is an innovative edited series of case studies informing archivists of ways to improve the archival experience using Web 2.0 technologies.

And he has been one of the driving forces behind the creation of the Journal of Western Archives. This is the best of example of Gordon’s mover and shaker status. I remember him coming to the Northwest Archivists Board to pitch this idea in 2005 or 2006. People questioned whether it could get done. But he diligently rounded up board support from the western regionals, found funding to support hosting it, and pushed to make it open access (via Creative Commons). It is a stunning achievement. Now he didn’t do it alone. Cory Nimer was also a driving force and western archival leaders provided support. But Gordon’s drive really made this project happen.

Gordon’s approach to innovation and entrepreneurship as well as his tenacity and ability to collaborate singled him out in the minds of the judges as someone we wanted to recognize as one of our Movers and Shakers in Archives.

Jennifer O’Neal, Head Archivist, Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian

Jennifer’s contributions center on an area that has been the topic of much discussion in the profession–what constitutes responsible care and stewardship of Native American collections. Her nominator writes:

Professionally, she is a founding member of the Society of American Archivists’ Native American Archives Roundtable. She also participated in an international gathering in Flagstaff, Ariz., in April 2006 that drafted the best practices for the culturally responsive care and use of Native American archival materials, which produced the document ‘Protocols for Native American Archival Materials.’ She has also worked with ALA’s Traditional Cultural Expressions group, the Native American Protocols Forum working group, and has been active in the work of SAA’s Cultural Property Working Group.

She is passionate about her work and goals, but is open and secure enough to include others’ beliefs and dreams in the conversation. She is a perfect representative of collaborative, respectful processes “ I have never seen her take another’s views dismissively and her good humor and light heart have made many meetings, dealing with contentious issues and cantankerous people, move towards equitable solutions.

Jennifer’s work in this important area benefits us as archivists, but is also a valuable reminder of the overarching need to better understand and respect the diverse cultures of our collections, our communities, and our colleagues.

Chris Prom, Assistant University Archivist and Associate Professor of Library Administration, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Fulbright Distinguished Scholar and Research Fellow, Centre for Archive and Information Studies, University of Dundee, UK

Chris Prom’s name is probably familiar to everyone because of his extensive work on the EAD and EAC working groups, his role in developing Archon, and his many presentations and publications, including co-editing College and University Archives: Readings in Theory and Practice. That would certainly be enough to justify a nomination, but Chris was nominated this year for something entirely different–the work he has been pursing as Fulbright Distinguished Scholar and Research Fellow in the Centre for Archive and Information Studies at the University of Dundee. His colleagues there wrote:

Chris’ “Practical E-Records” research project aims ‘to evaluate software and conceptual models that archivists and records manager might use to identify preserve, and provide access to electronic records’. To this end he has reviewed countless policies, procedures, research reports, methodologies, best practice, guidance and software tools all with the aim of establishing their efficacy in typical archival/record keeping settings and with typical electronic records. He has disseminated many of his findings during his research via his blog and at professional conference and seminars and is developing a suite of recommendations which can be implemented by Archivists and Records Managers, all of whom now need to cope with electronic records and information but very few of whom have any technical background in the sorts of skills needed to interpret and analyse e-records research and software ‘solutions’.

Chris’ undertaking to develop a research project of practical use to the working Archivist and to disseminate the findings as widely as possible is the key reason for his nomination. Rather than investigate an abstract technical or theoretical subject Chris has chosen to synthesise the work of others and undertake new scholarly investigations in a manner that both contributes to professional intellectual discourse and is of genuine relevance to the practising recordkeeping community. No other e-records research project has been constituted in this manner and the way Chris has developed this project speaks to both his integrity and intellect. As such it seems appropriate that his contribution to the profession is marked this year.

And the judges agreed that Chris’ contributions to the profession, as well as the dedication and diversity of his efforts, made him stand out as one of this year’s Movers and Shakers in Archives.

I hope you join me in congratulating our winners once more and also in thanking our judges, Mary Manning (Texas A&M University) and John LeGloahec (National Archives and Records Administration), both of whom volunteered to serve on their own time and were not acting as representatives of their employers. It’s always a pleasure to review these nominations and my thanks to everyone who submitted a nomination this year.

I’m not saying that zombies will definitely attack on Sunday, but

What if they did?

And, what if you, an eligible SAA voter had been procrastinating, waiting to cast your ballot until the very last day. Yes, Sunday. And then, wham–zombies! So there you are, surrounded by zombies, and on top that, you now must live with the guilt that missed your chance to participate in SAA’s democratic process. You’ll have to live with that awful feeling for the rest of your life (which might be very short, but that’s not important right now). The important thing is that as of yesterday, only 20% of eligible SAA members had voted. So, for that 80%–I’m not saying it would definitely be zombies. It might be a giant squid. It might be killer bees. You might just lose your internet connection at home for some reason. You might even, just maybe, be doing other things on Sunday and forget to log in and vote.

So, why don’t you do it now? And talk to your friends and colleagues about the risk of a zombie invasion this weekend and remind them to vote too.

And, while you’re at it, don’t forget that nominations for the Movers and Shakers in Archives awards are due by this Monday, April 12. Granted, that gives you one more day to recover what whatever disasters might befall you over the weekend, but still, putting together a nomination takes a little bit longer than the SAA voting. So it’s time to stop procrastinating about that too.

Voting is easy. So easy, even a zombie could probably do it. So why don’t you?

zombies

Three things to do, and then a break

Over the weekend, this blog celebrated its third birthday, or blogiversary, I suppose. So thank you all for your continued interest and support, and to really celebrate I’m taking a short break from all social media. Yes, people can’t believe it, but it’s true. Twitter, Facebook, the whole thing. When I announced this on Twitter someone pointed out that this Saturday is “No Tech Day,” so I’m just doing it a little bit early. I’ll be back soon but I think it’s very healthy to step away for a while. In the meantime . . .

  • The New York Public Library has launched a new blog series, “My Library,” featuring interviews with library patrons about why they value their local library. It’s a good model to consider for archives I think, don’t you?
  • Don’t forget to decide who you want to nominate for this year’s Movers and Shakers in Archives awards. The deadline is Monday April 12, but there is no penalty for early nominations, so get yours in before you start panicking about your taxes.
  • And speaking of procrastination, have you voted in the SAA elections yet? You don’t get a little sticker when you’re done, but if you help get me elected to Council, I’ll give everyone a little sticker at the annual meeting. Oh, wait, I’m probably not allowed to say that. I bet I can’t attempt to sway the SAA electorate with the offer of little stickers. Oh well, here’s a virtual little sticker for you that you can print out and wear proudly after you’ve voted for whoever you chose to vote for.
  • i_voted_sticker

    Now, I’m off to go smell some flowers and enjoy my spring break!

It’s awards sesason again: Call for nominatons for “Movers and Shakers in Archives” awards

The coming of spring means many things, but around here it means awards season. So get ready to nominate!

Now in their third year, ArchivesNext is pleased to sponsor the Movers and Shakers in Archives awards. These awards are intended to recognize people or organizations in the United States who are innovative, creative, and making a difference in the archival world. Previous winners include:

  • Tracey Baker
  • Terry Baxter
  • Lisa Cohen
  • The Council of State Archivists
  • Elizabeth Dow
  • Brenda Gunn
  • Russell James
  • Mark Matienzo
  • Deborah Rice
  • Kathleen Roe

If you’re not familiar with this award, you can read about the 2009 winners, the 2008 winners and the post that kicked it off (and one that followed soon after).

To submit a nomination, send the information described below to: nominations [at] archivesnext.com by Monday, April 12.

Required Nomination Information:

Nominator (Name, Title, Institution, and Email)
Nominee (Name, Title, Institution and Email)

Justification:
1) Reasons for nomination.
2) Describe one event, project or situation that illustrates your reason for this nomination.
3) Describe one attribute or characteristic that illustrates this nominee’s unique ability.

Note: When providing information in the “Justification,” provide as much information, including specific examples, as possible. Include any information you have about the nominee’s activities inside and outside of the profession and the influence they have had over others.

One additional reference who can support your nomination (Name, Title, Institution and Email)

Note: You can nominate yourself, but please supply two additional references. Past winners are not eligible to win again, no matter how much they continue to move and shake.

Please let me know if you have any questions about the awards or the nomination process. And if you have someone in mind, go ahead and get your nomination in as early as can. April 12 may seem like a long time away, but it’s not. Nominate early and often!

Profiles of Archives Movers & Shakers Winners

So, let’s take a look at why the judges chose Lisa Cohen, the Council of State Archivists, Brenda Gunn, and Mark Matienzo as excellent examples of “people or organizations in the United States who are innovative, creative, and making a difference in the archival profession.” Continue reading “Profiles of Archives Movers & Shakers Winners”

Winners of the 2009 Movers & Shakers in Archives awards

I’m very pleased to announce the winners of this year’s Movers & Shakers in Archives Awards. These awards (shamelessly copied from Library Journal’s Movers & Shakers) are intended to recognize people or organizations in the United States who are innovative, creative, and making a difference in the archival profession. Picking from a group of highly-qualified nominees, the judges selected:

Lisa Cohen, the Pacific Northwest Lesbian Archives
The Council of State Archivists
Brenda Gunn, The University of Texas at Austin
Mark Matienzo, New York Public Library

I’ll be following up with a post in the next few days that describes the qualities of these people (and CosA) that we think make them exemplary members of our community. But for now, congratulations Lisa, Brenda, Mark, and everyone at CoSA!

Stop procrastinating–one week left to nominate for M&S in Archives Awards!

Yes, when I announced it a few weeks ago, you thought you had all the time in the world, but time flies and now you only have one week left to submit your nominations for this year’s Movers & Shakers in Archives Awards. Don’t assume someone else will do it–if you know an archivist who deserves to be given some public recognition, put some time aside and submit a nomination.

Continuing in the tradition of last year’s winners, these awards are intended to recognize people or organizations in the United States who are innovative, creative, and making a difference.

To submit a nomination, send the information described below to “nominations [at] archivesnext.com” by June 30, 2009.

Required Nomination Information:

Nominator:
Name, Title, Address, Phone and Email
Nominee:
Name, Title, Address, Phone and Email

Justification:

1) Reasons for nomination.

2) Describe one event, project or situation that illustrates your reason for this nomination.

3) Describe one attribute or characteristic that illustrates this nominee’s unique ability.

Note: When providing information in the “Justification,” provide as much information, including specific examples, as possible. Include any information you have about the nominee’s activities inside and outside of the profession and the influence they have had over others.

Additional reference who can support your nomination:
Name, Title, Phone and Email

Note: You can nominate yourself, but please supply two additional references. Past winners are not eligible to win again.

Call for 2009 Movers & Shakers in Archives!

Sorry for the delay, but yes, it’s time to recognize the excellence of your colleagues in this year’s Movers & Shakers in Archives awards. This award has a long and prestigious history–dating all the way back to last year. If you missed it, here is the post that describes the winners of the 2008 Movers & Shakers in Archives, and a couple of posts that give some background are here and here.

Continuing in the tradition of last year’s winners, these awards are intended to recognize people or organizations in the United States who are innovative, creative, and making a difference.

To submit a nomination, send the information described below to “nominations [at] archivesnext.com” by June 30, 2009.

Required Nomination Information:

Nominator:
Name, Title, Address, Phone and Email
Nominee:
Name, Title, Address, Phone and Email

Justification:

1) Reasons for nomination.

2) Describe one event, project or situation that illustrates your reason for this nomination.

3) Describe one attribute or characteristic that illustrates this nominee’s unique ability.

Note: When providing information in the “Justification,” provide as much information, including specific examples, as possible. Include any information you have about the nominee’s activities inside and outside of the profession and the influence they have had over others.

Additional reference who can support your nomination:
Name, Title, Phone and Email

Note: You can nominate yourself, but please supply two additional references. Past winners are not eligible to win again.

Six people who are shaking things up in archives

As promised, here are profiles of the six winners of the 2008 Movers and Shakers in Archives awards. I know I said they would be short, but these people have done so much they deserve as much space as I can give them.

Continue reading “Six people who are shaking things up in archives”